MOTOREX DRY POWER PERFORMANCE LUBE SPRAY

300ml £10.30

Motorex Dry Power Performance Lube spray is recommended, by Motorex, for mtb and downhill bikes. Unusual, for the aerosol breed, which can be a bit too jack-of-all-trades. It’s quite pricey but could prove popular with some commuters and others wanting a clean, quick start. 

 

Pros: good delivery and has outperformed the manufacturers blurb in some aspects.

Cons: doesn’t keep the chain pristine for long, if you are bothered by that.

Ingredients, options and delivery method

 

Motorex has not succeeded by sharing secrets, but this is a biodegradable, synthetic wax and oil concoction, with a propellant added. Our 300ml spray version is suited, according to the blurb, to give high performance in predominantly dry conditions with a durability of around 150km mark.

There’s also a liquid version, which Michael has achieved around 300 miles per application and a pump spray. Some suggest using the 300ml spray to refill the pump-spray for better economy, but that is a matter of debate.

 

Whilst on the topic, for many of us a spray lube is for convenience when your cycling buddy arrives with a dry chain, getting rid of that metallic rattle at the trailhead, or when you just want to get moving quickly. You’d expect greater longevity from the liquid and an overnight cure.

The label lists warnings about the pressurised can. Basically don’t leave to in hot sunshine and keep it away form flames. They also suggest not smoking. Good idea in my opinion whether using a flammable lube or not, but best take care. There are medical warnings, too. All sounds a bit dangerous, but much of this is generic. Don’t spray to in your eyes or mouth and you should be ok.

The spray has the usual aerosol-type head, but comes with a rather neat feature. Gently lift off the white head, and use a black head and nozzle for increased accuracy on chains and small targets. Even better, the nozzle is held in a  slot in the grey cap, so even disorganised fettlers - like me - can keep it safe and sound. 

Application

 

Shake well and then get on with it.

 

The black nozzle quickly became my preferred application method. In this context, I really like the Dry Power. Accurate application to the chain and giving a wide berth to braking surfaces is a real plus. Likewise for a quick squirt on mech pivot points or a seized cleat mechanism. Bear in mind that it is pretty sensitive, so be gentle of touch. I’ve also used it on cable inners when rejuvenating brakes on one of the family bikes.

In the name of value for money, I initially gave the chain three spins per application, but reduced this to two without any adverse effect. Mind you, its worth ensuring good coverage.

 

Though there did not seem to be exceptional wastage, a rag is useful to wipe up what there is. However, even the aerosol-style head did not dribble.

The propellant will disappear into the ether, leaving the synthetic wax-oil mix to penetrate the inner workings and coat the chain plates. There’s no curing time suggested.

Interestingly, Motorex suggest that a reapplication should be given after each journey to maintain prime performance, though journey means different mileage to different folk.

Performance

 

Initially, I sprayed and went with no more prep than a quick wipe of the chain with an old oily rag. Second time round, a thorough clean was followed by a night curing in the shed before setting off. I can’t say that there was a huge difference in durability, though the latter had the edge.

 

Weather conditions in the testing period should have been just about perfect for it. Dry days and dusty roads. Even the fords were low, so I can’t comment on performance when weather turns wet. In any case, it is not meant for the rainy season.

 

Unloading the old MTB from the car, things looked a bit dry, so a quick spray and away on the trail. A couple of hundred metres and things had gone quiet, with gears changing neatly - despite aged shifters and mechs. On return, finding a rider fussing over a stiff mech, it did not take long for the lube to sort it out, with the aid of a bit of manipulation. Get up and go commuters may find this rapid action attractive.

 

Two weekends on the tourer both saw a hundred and fifty miles up. Eerily, the death rattle sounded between five and ten miles of home. Around my expectations for a spray-on lube, and above manufacturers suggestion of around 150km. WD40 All Condition Lube did not, in our test, manage that distance, but that’s not a totally fair comparison.

Dusty country roads caused the chain to gather grime fairly rapidly, but there seemed to be little impact on function. A nice clean bike may be dandy, but tourers and off-roaders get used to a bit of dirt. in any case, holding dirt outside the inner workings is part of the plan. A wipe with a  rag seems to sort things out, especially of followed by a quick once over re-lube. 

 

Conclusion

 

In the long run, spray-ons are a matter of convenience, in my opinion: your chain almost always gets more mileage out of a liquid lube - wet, dry, wax, ceramic. In that context, Motorex Dry Power Performance Lube is pretty good. It does what to says and I have found it clean and easy to deliver to these parts in need. Having said that, there’s a lot of competition out there, such as SKS Lube Your Chain. Even so, this is not a bad price for a decent chain lube with other applications.

Verdict 3.25/5 Decent spray, but mile-monsters will go for a more durable liquid type.

 

Steve Dyster

 

https://www.motorex.com/en-us

PUBLISHED JUNE 2018

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