PROVIZ REFLECT 360 HELMET

337g (Medium as tested) £79.99 

Proviz Reflect 360 cycling helmet is most notable for its cutting edge retro-reflective technology. Generally refined and well-executed, commuters are its primary audience. However, subtle shape, decent ventilation and moderate, detachable peak also lend it to touring and light trail duties. 

So what’s special about this K-star reflective technology then?

Well, these are millions of tiny mirrored glass beads impregnated within the outer shell and sealed under a generous lacquer topcoat. This is so they won’t get worn away, or weather like stickers can. By day, the two-tone grey is very subtle and arguably cooler than day-glow, albeit less useful on murky mornings. 

To address this, the 360’s head ring incorporates two flashing LEDs. These can be run as a pair or individually and are powered by a CR2032 button type cell. Pro-Viz don’t cite expected run times but our factory battery is still going strong, several dark weeks in.

When graced by vehicle, or street lighting, those logos and graphics turn a brilliant white - larger vehicles often noted the helmet before acknowledging my 1000 lumen front 50 lumen rear lighting system. 360 degree coverage also means you’ll stay on their radar - a godsend in all contexts, though especially when orbiting busy roundabouts, or turning right.

 

There is another button type notch around the crown, this is so you can lock the straps in their desired place for grab and go convenience. Talking of which, the multi-fit chin strap system also proved quirky, especially in the dark but I’d got the hang of it within a few days.   

While 13 vents sound low rent these days, they scoop masses of cooling air inside. I never once felt uncomfortably warm through a very mild October. Despite being blessed with a generous thatch, I needed to go the skull cap route during our recent cold snap.

At the other extreme, extensive bug netting should keep bees and wasps out during the warmer months and while more subtle than dedicated trail lids, the removable peak does a reasonable job of shielding the eyes from strong sunlight, grit and other particles. 

 

There are only two sizes; medium and large. In practice, 52-58cm or 55-63cm should suit most people. Nudging 337g, our medium was 47g heavier than cited but not outlandish for this genre and I’ve never been overly conscious of those additional grams.   

At higher speeds, a little wind noise becomes apparent but not enough to hamper awareness or easy interaction with other riders. A mixture of fast-paced point to point commutes, training rides and longer, club typical distances confirm its it’s a surprisingly capable all rounder.  

However, I have discovered some unexpected limitations, which may be a deal-breaker for some. While ventilation is good, their shape and location can prohibit helmet mounted lighting. I have managed to affix safety models further back, or indeed, on the side - action-cam style. 

This wasn’t ideal, or in the case of 700lumen trail models, practical. Aside from the quirky chin fastener, I was disappointed that the protective hard shell did not extend the full circumference. This leaves the EPS vulnerable to everyday carelessness and not what I expect from this price point.

Michael Stenning

 

Verdict 3/5 Innovative and comfortable helmet for general riding but closure and some detailing is slightly disappointing.

www.todayscyclist.co.uk 

 

PUBLISHED DECEMBER 2016

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The plastic mount should fit most saddle rails, although there may be issues with suspension seat posts.

 

Finally, there’s a light loop and a little reflective detailing.

 

Mounting 3.5/5

 

On the subject of the mount, the Iron Pack range offers a choice of ways to secure the pack to the saddle rails: plastic (TF) or Velcro (DS). Debate can drag on about the merits for road riding, gravel, off-roading etc. Generally, people have their own preference. On the whole, for rougher riding, I prefer a more solid fixture – so I’d go for the TF for off-roading and gravel. On the other hand, the DS may move a little more, but that, to me, is hardly significant with small bags – even when weighed down by tools etc.

 

A quick glance at the TF bracket shows that it is not symmetrical. The groove on one side is slid onto the saddle rail. The whole bracket is then twisted, so that the more rounded corner slides in. Push the whole firmly until it is lodged securely between the rails. No release levers; no hex-head bolts; no Velcro loops; no fuss.The plastic mount should fit most saddle rails, although there may be issues with suspension seat posts.