MOON METEOR STORM PRO FRONT LIGHT

269g including bracket and plug-in remote button £124.99

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The Moon Meteor Storm Pro Front Light is a ten mode torch-type model with a range between 2000 and 100lumens, which sounds perfect for every scenario from the darkest lanes, to neon soaked city centres.

 

The CNC machined casing combines form with rugged practicality, protecting two Cree XM-L2 (U2) diodes, switch gear and circuitry from physical knocks, while serving as a heat sink, so these components stand the best chance of long and productive lives. This also prevents it becoming uncomfortably hot to touch after an hour or so in the most powerful modes.

  

Most lights have a battery life indicator but these tend to be simple traffic light types, giving a vague idea. The Meteor Storm Pro’s tells you in minute detail - you can literally see it climb down, one block at a time. Coupled with auto save kick down functions, the likelihood of being plunged into complete darkness is extremely slim. 

Its powered by two removable 3.6 volt 3200mAH cells, spares being readily available, extending riding horizons (even in the highest settings) to dusk ‘till dawn endurance runs.   

 

Mind you, full charges mean six hours at the mains, longer from laptops, PCs and other third party devices. Not ideal for workplace based refuelling.

 

It also shares the same mounting hardware with the lowlier LX760. No surprise then that the handlebar bracket achieves a vice like grip on all bar diameters, ranging from super-skinny 22mm to 35mm and the thumb screw makes whipping on/off in gloved hands a cinch. Vibration, let alone slippage have been moot points-even when hustling along dirt roads at 25+mph.

It also comes complete with a nifty extension cable and plug-in remote control. This plugs into the USB port and is long enough to wrap unobtrusively around brake lever hoods so you needn’t take your hands off the controls to change mode. Not that the positive rubberised switch is tricky and the memory function makes things even easier. 

 

However, this limits weatherproofing to IPX4, which is fine for the heaviest rain but not winter mountain biking. Talking of which and used on its own; even at full blast, the hybrid beam pattern is only suitable for shorter sections of forest trails. Think quick, mile long detours on the crosser. 

Depressing either switch for two seconds, will spring the light to life and the centre mounted panel communicates charge level in a series of blue dots, which staircase downwards in a more useful fashion than crude “traffic light” types. Like its LX cousin, the lens produces a hybrid of 17degree spot and 83 degree flood for navigation and presence. The latter was welcome in all contexts but particularly round town and in the lower, steady modes.

 

Unlike £25 auction site specials boasting similar numbers, the lens and reflector project a decent pool of light that doesn’t dazzle. Run at 1700lumens, there was more than enough bite for 40mph, even through winding back doubles.  Oncoming traffic has dipped at car typical distances; just remember to do the same.

 

There is even a 2000 lumen “boost” mode, which aside from very brief moments off-road; served little purpose, other than draining the battery in ten minutes flat. 

 

Hero to zero, ours has run for 1hr54, which isn’t far behind those using bulky frame mounted battery packs, I’ve moved between modes 2 and 3, 1150 and 850 lumens apiece, primarily because they’ve hit that sweet spot between performance and economy - 2hrs 54 and 4hrs 47 respectively.

 

Mode 3 (850 lumens) seemed directly comparable  with my Univega’s 800lumen Exposure revo dynamo-perfect for 17-20mph efforts along unlit roads, 25 in semi rural contexts. There’s been no need to dip but other traffic certainly acknowledged me from 200metres. Moon say 5hrs, I’ve managed 4hrs 54, close enough for all but the most pedantic.

 

Mode 4 450 is still better and brighter than many commuter plus models, sipping reserves at a very moderate 7hrs 23, which with intelligent use sees a week's semi rural commuting from a single charge. Alternating between 4 and 5 (150 lumens) bought an extra 50 minutes, although a 250 lumen option would be perfect for sub/urban commuting. Generally speaking, I’ve switched between modes 1, 2 and 3. Even with judicious use of the 2000lumen boost, I’ve managed a competitive 5hours between charges. 

 

There are also five flashing options, which stir very mixed emotions in me. I can just about appreciate 100, 500 and 1000 lumens, backed up with a 200 lumen SOS in emergency but that aside; even the murkiest mornings have only just called for 100, so I’m confounded by the aggressive, though undeniably frugal (47hrs 42) 200 lumen daylight setting.

 

Ultimately, there is a lot to like here and the Meteor Storm Pro is definitely one of the most practical lights for long distance, back of beyond fun. I loved the quality of output, remote bar control, the intelligent battery indicator and compact design.

 

In a fiercely competitive market, £134 sounds quite pricey and given it’s a road lamp, I would happily swap the 200 lumen boost and daylight modes for a more useful 250 lumen constant option. That said; I’ve seen them for a tenner or so less online and its still in keeping with Lezyne’s 1500 lumen Deca Drive 1500xxl .

Michael Stenning

 

Verdict 3.75/5 Incredibly versatile and powerful compact lamp with some wonderful touches but needs some very minor tweaks to fully justify asking price.

www.raleigh.co.uk

 

PUBLISHED SEPTEMBER 2016

UPDATED OCTOBER 2017

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